After Party on Wall Street

On Wall Street's Slingapours bar in Orlando, the rock music was blaring Tuesday evening, but no one was dancing. Instead, most people were intently watching sprawling figures on a big screen.

It was election night.

The room was half full with either people wearing t-shirts and jeans or suits and ties - the uniforms of either campaign volunteers or members of the media. The major television news networks, like Fox and NBC, set up camp with their bulky lighting gear. Broadcast reporters typed away on their smart phones and laptops. The print reporters paced by the food with their notebooks and pens in hand. The story of the night was this : Democrat Alan Grayson loses Congressional seat to Republican Daniel Webster.

What the mainstream media didn't report was what Grayson talked about after he conceded defeat. What I found the most interesting was that Grayson starts and ends his five-minute speech with the issue of health care - almost word for word.

Here is what I mean. This is what Grayson says 0:13 into his concession speech.

[audio:http://eunalhee.com/wp-content/uploads/Grayson_hc1.mp3|titles=Grayson1]

And then 4:42 into it, nearly at the end.

[audio:http://eunalhee.com/wp-content/uploads/Grayson_hc2.mp3|titles=Grayson2]

Grayson is an outspoken advocate for President Obama's health care overhaul. He is probably best known for his speech that he gave on the House floor last September, when he talked about the GOP health care plan : "Don't get sick. And if you do get sick, die quickly."

A day later, this is how Grayson apologized to the Republicans for that presentation : "I would like to apologize to the dead."

Here are some other things Grayson said while talking about health care  : "If Barack Obama has a BLT sandwich tomorrow for lunch, [Republicans] will try to ban bacon." "I've established a website called NamesOfTheDead.com."

And the list goes on and on. You can hear more on his YouTube channel.

I asked some of Grayson's supporters during the election night party whether they liked his no-nonsense, and perhaps offensive, approach during the House debates on health care. Most of them said they like him precisely for that reason.

What do you think? Were these speeches out of line? Or were they refreshing?